Bringing The Portability With GModule

As I’ve been writing DMP Photo Booth, I’ve been taking great pains to improve portability. I’ve got a fancy module-based architecture designed to segregate the non-portable sections of the project from the Core. The only problem? A bunch of ugly POSIX calls: dlopen(), dlsym(), and dlclose(). Kind of defeats the purpose of using modules for portability if I don’t load said modules in a portable way, doesn’t it? I thought so too…

Enter GModule

GModule is part of the GLib family of libraries. GModule provides a portable way to handle working with shared libraries. It works on any POSIX compliant platform, as well as Windows, and HP-UX via its shl_load() mechanism. You can read more about GModule in the GLib Reference Manual. While I’m sure there is some edge case that GLib doesn’t cover, this is far more portable than I’d initially envisioned DMP Photo Booth being. (Yay, HP-UX support!)

Another consideration in all of this is the adding of dependencies. However, since I’m already using GTK3 for my GUI, I already have a GLib dependency, so there is no added burden to using GModule.

The How

GModule is actually quite similar to using POSIX dlfcn.h functions. Some semantics are different, but GModule has functions that are roughly equivalent to the POSIX functions.

GModule * g_module_open(const gchar *file_name, GModuleFlags flags);

G_module_open() is the replacement for dlopen() in POSIX. The GModule pointer that it returns is the replacement for the void pointer returned by dlopen(). GModuleFlags is an integer flag that can be boolean or’d in. Your options for this are G_MODULE_BIND_LAZY and G_MODULE_BIND_LOCAL which are equivalent to RTLD_LAZY and RTLD_LOCAL.

gboolean g_module_symbol(GModule *module, const gchar *symbol_name, gpointer *symbol);

This is your replacement for dlsym(), and functions mostly in the same way. module is the gmodule pointer to extract symbols from, symbol_name is the symbol to get, and symbol is the function pointer to populate. This function returns true if successful, and false if not. This function is commonly called like this:

if (!g_module_symbol(dmp_pb_camera_module, "dmp_cm_capture", (gpointer *) &dmp_cm_capture)) { /* error handling here */ }

This idiom can be found throughout the GLib documentation. Did you see the craziness that is argument number 3? Dmp_cm_capture is a function pointer, as you may remember, but GObject tends to make things a little tricky, and will throw thousands of warnings if you don’t cast your function pointer to a gpointer *. The definition of gpointer is:

typedef void* gpointer;

That means that a gpointer * is actually void **. Therefore, you are expected to pass in the address of your pointer using an ampersand, hence (gpointer *) &dmp_cm_capture.

gboolean g_module_close(GModule *module);

As a nice change of pace from the last function, this one is quite straight forward. You pass in your GModule pointer, and it closes it, just like dlclose(), then returns true (or false, if an error occurs). Nothing particularly noteworthy here.

gboolean g_module_supported();

While this function does not line up with a POSIX function, I felt it was important to mention this one. This function returns true if you are on a platform that GModule supports. If you’re on Linux/UNIX/OSX, or Windows, or HP-UX, this should return true. If you’re hacking your Atari-2600, it will most likely return false. Stick this in front of calls to GModule functions and save yourself a headache.

Moving Forward

My design philosophy for DMP Photo Booth is that the Core should compile on any (typical) platform with no changes. Using GLib, this seems to be within reach. With GModules, GTK3 User Interfaces, I’ve kept the faith so far. Looking through the GLib documentation, it has GThreads, so when I inevitably get mired in threaded programming, I should be golden. GLib also has support for Pipes and file IO via GIOChannel, but the documentation claims only partial support in Windows.

Here’s hoping all goes well!

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