Introducing DMP Photo Booth

In June of 2014, I will be getting married. One problem: I am currently an unemployed student, and my fiancee Liz is also between jobs. Recent studies show that the average couple in this day and age spends an average of Twenty Four Bajillion Dollars on their wedding. Capital Bajillion. Italicised. Even were I still employed, this would pose a problem for me. Needless to say, we began looking for costs to cut. Liz really wants a photo booth, and I think it sounds fun. Unfortunatley photo booths run from $750-1000 to rent. The solution: DMP Photo Booth.

On Reinventing The Wheel

DMP Photo Booth wasn’t actually my first thought. That would be “well, there must be some open-source photo booth software we can use!” It turns out that there is. People like me who’ve had this issue and whipped something up for themselves. Some of these projects even have fancy websites. Unfortunately, none of these seem to have reached the level of maturity where you can just grab them and go. No, we’re talking old-school Linux status projects. If I’m going to have to put that much effort into making this work, I might as well roll my own. Besides, it will be good experience.

Requirements

The photo booth must do the usual photo booth stuff; it should programatically take 3-4 pictures, arrange them in a vertical strip with a background picture, and print them on photo paper. This should all work with the user only having to press a button(not a key on the laptop, an actual button), and there should be some sort of indicator when the pictures are going to be taken.

Some reasearch turns up the existence of a Picture Transfer Protocol, or PTP, that has been “supported” by the major camera vendors since 2002 or so. PTP allows you to programatically control a digital camera, and should serve nicely. I own a printer that can print on photo paper; it seems likely that I will be able to use the operating system’s printing facilities to handle this. Finally, I will construct a button and indicator thingamabober using Arduino.

Architecture

I have decided to go with a modular architecture. There will be four components: a Camera Module, a Printer Module, a Trigger Module, and the Core Application.

Core

The Core Application will bring the GUI, tenatively planned to be implemented using GTK+3, and will interface with the component modules. The core expects the component modules to implement specific functions that will be called to handle their operation. The component modules will be dynamic libraries that can be swapped out at runtime.

Camera Module

The Camera Module will handle the operation of the camera. The Camera Module currently is expected to implement two functions:

int dmp_cm_capture(); int dmp_cm_download(char * location);

These two functions do what they say: the first takes a picture, and the second downloads the picture to the passed-in path. The reference Camera Module will use libgphoto2 to implement these functions, but this module exists to provide the capability to use any method. A module that uses some other PTP library, or some custom protocol, or a dummy module that uses a picture on the filesystem, or uses a scanner, or anything else can be swapped in at runtime and this will all be transparent to the Core.

Printer Module

Shockingly, the Printer Module will handle printing. The Printer Module is currently expected to implement one function:

int dmp_pm_print(char * to_print);

This function prints the file at the path that is passed into the function. This module prevents the Core from needing to know how to print. The Core tells the Printer Module to print, and the Printer Module can figure out how to print in Linux, or Mac OSX, or how to print to a Game Boy Printer, or whatever. The Core doesn’t care.

Trigger Module

The Trigger Module is the module that knows how to operate the custom photo booth equipment. The Trigger Module currently is expected to implement two functions:

int dmp_tm_add_trigger_handler(void (*th)()); int dmp_tm_set_countdown(int current);

The first function adds a callback function that will be called by the Trigger Module when it detects that the button has been pressed. The second function updates the countdown indicator. Since some dealybopper that I made out of Arduino is basically the definition of non-portable, I decided to create a module for it. The reference implementation will be written for my equipment, but this module can be replaced with one that uses some other input device with minimal effort.

Moving Forward

DMP Photo Booth represents my first major open source project, and it has many moving parts. With this groundwork laid, I have broken the project down into more manageable chunks. I have four main components that each represent different challenges: GUI programming in the Core, poorly documented mystery libraries in the Camera Module, Learning to Arduino to finish the Trigger Module, and learning the Linux printing system for the Printer Module.

Rome wasn’t built in a day, but it was started in one. There will surely be many challenges and roadblocks on the way. Expect to hear all about them here!

One response to “Introducing DMP Photo Booth”

  1. C++ JaBink says :

    impressive young skywalker….impressive

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: